Water

Clean water is the foundation for healthy & prosperous communities. While our nation has made significant progress since the 1970’s in cleaning up many of our rivers, bays and other vital water resources, we still face significant water quality and quantity challenges. Drinking water sources are threatened by pollution and overconsumption, and some of these threats are made worse by climate change.

South Platte River -- Photo credit: Jennifer Peters

Denver Water Wants to Hear From You

Denver Water has proposed a bold plan to eliminate one of the largest sources of lead in its distribution system—lead service lines—while protecting public health.

Recent Actions

Don't Let the Trump administration take your voice away!

This summer the Trump administration unveiled a proposal to make it easier – a lot easier – to

Help Pennsylvania Address PFAS Chemicals

Email your state legislators today and ask them to take steps that’ll help begin addressing the PFAS public health issue.

Don't let state legislators turn back progress on protecting the Great Lakes

On Monday Governor Whitmer took action to protect our Great Lakes, strengthen Michigan’s response to PFAS contamination, and bring Michigan into the US Climate Alliance.

Urge Oakland County Commissioners to adopt a septic code

Michigan is the only state in the US without a statewide septic code, and currently only 13 out of our 83 counties have septic codes that require inspections.

Water Blog Posts

South Platte River -- Photo credit: Jennifer Peters
August 1, 2019

Visit South Platte River Park in Littleton, Colorado (a suburb a few miles south of Denver) on a summer weekend and you’ll likely see dozens of people paddling, wading, fishing, or tubing on the river. A few weeks ago I was one of those tubers enjoying higher than normal flows on the South Platte, thanks to the high snowpack this past winter. As we floated on riffles and gentle rapids, families of ducks grazed at the river’s edge and trout swam beneath us. Occasionally we got caught on someone’s fishing line or bumped tubes in crowded sections of the river.

Sewage Overflow in Baltimore. Photo by Jennifer Kunze
July 15, 2019

Last year, over 5,000 basement backups were reported to 311 in Baltimore City. The number of basement backups has increased over the years with such a large number of people having to deal with the issue. Baltimore City’s Emergency Response Plan does not require the city to clean up after a basement backup, forcing many homeowners to spend thousands of dollars and expose themselves to an unhealthy environment.

Sediment plume in Baltimore's Inner Harbor. Photo credit: Baltimore Sun.
July 9, 2019

Yesterday the city of Baltimore experienced a severe wet weather event that resulted in flood warnings throughout the DMV area, coupled with a water main break downtown. While the water main break is responsible for the day’s increase in train delays and a strong flow of murky brown water into the inner harbor near Howard and Pratt, an infrastructure failure may not be necessary for the same problem to occur in the near future.