Protecting the Chesapeake

Marylanders love their crabs, fish, and the Bay, but this way of life could disappear forever unless we follow through on our pollution reduction commitments. Clean Water is working to reduce agricultural pollution, address polluted runoff, and keep Maryland on track.

A forest in Maryland with stream erosion (not Seneca Creek)

No M83 in Montgomery County

M83 is an outdated solution to our traffic and development problem

A stream flows green through a wooded area, indicating a leak during a dye test.

Safer Septic Systems for Maryland

Maryland’s Chesapeake Bay Cleanup requires nutrient reductions from every sector that contributes to water pollution, including septic systems.

Photo credit: Dalis Davidson of Dancing Leaf Farm

Montgomery County Council Votes to Advance Solar in the Agricultural Reserve With Care

On Thursday January 26th the Council discussed and voted on amendments to ZTA 20-01 –a provision to allow siting up to three square mile

Power plant behind water spewing smoke. Photo credit: Martin Haas / Shutterstock

Power Plant Pollution Poisoning the Chesapeake Bay

Coal-burning power plants are poisoning the Chesapeake Bay with millions of harmful pollutants every year, including excessive nutrients that contribute to “dead zones” where crabs, oysters, fish and other aquatic life cannot survive.

 

From We All Live Downstream

2017 Annapolis in Spring
April 13, 2022

Another year, another legislative session complete for us in Maryland! Maryland’s legislative session runs for just 90 days each year, between January and April, and ended this year on Monday 4/11. It was a busy legislative session full of lots of action on clean water, clean air, and environmental justice - and Clean Water Action members like you sent 3,000 emails to your delegates and senators in support of our priority legislation. Thank you for everything you do!

Here’s how our top clean water priorities fared:

March 21, 2022

M83 is an outdated solution to our traffic and development problems, yet it is still a part of Montgomery County's Master Plan of Highways and Transitways. Two other parallel highways exist - instead of investing in yet another highway Montgomery County should invest in transit and other transportation alternatives. Bus rapid transit, expanding Ride-On services, and investing in problematic intersections should be pursued before plowing through hundreds of acres of forest and preserve.

A collage of images from the 2020 legislative session
January 7, 2022

Maryland's legislative session starts this Wednesday! For the following 90 days, we'll be working to get important legislation passed for clean air, clean water, and healthy communities.