Protecting The Great Lakes and Michigan's Water

crumpled plastic water bottle / photo: flickr.com/jesse (CC BY 2.0)

Nestle Seeks to Increase Water Withdrawal Limit Again

Nestle has again applied to the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality (MDEQ) to increase the amount of water it is allowed to pump from wells near Evart, MI from 218 gallons per minute to 400 gallons per minute.

Septic tank lid. photo: flickr.com/mmwm (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Michigan needs a strong statewide sanitary code

Right now, the State House Natural Resources Committee is holding hearings on two bills, HB 5752 and HB 5753, that would create a statewide sanitary code for Michigan that requires regular inspections of all septic systems.

Michigan Currents - Fall 2017

Michigan Currents - Fall 2017

In this issue: Michigan’s Water Infrastructure — Investing in Our Future; Line 5 Update; Clean Water Members Clean Up Lake St. Clair Metropark; Michigan Septic Systems; Welcome Clean Water Action's New Michigan Director; Another Coal Plant Bites the Dust!

Enbridge’s Line 5 Tunnel Scheme Endangers Great Lakes, Michigan Jobs

“Michigan does not need Line 5, yet our state bears all the risks associated with a devastating Line 5 oil spill and gets next to nothing in return,” said Sean McBrearty, Clean Water Action’s Michigan Program Organizer.

From We All Live Downstream

Water from a faucet / photo: istock
July 10, 2018

In mid-June, after months of pressure from Clean Water Action members and public health advocates, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) finally released their study on the health effects of PFAS contamination.

Septic tank lid. photo: flickr.com/mmwm (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)
May 9, 2018

Each year, 9.4 billion gallons of raw sewage flow into our lakes and rivers from leaking septic systems, but Michigan is the only state in the U.S. without a uniform sanitary code requiring periodic inspections of septic systems.

Lake Michigan, photo: flickr.com/elviskennedy  (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)
April 9, 2018

Last week, the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality did the unthinkable; they ruled in favor of Nestle in their controversial bid to double the amount of water they pump for next to nothing and sell back to us.