Lead and Drinking Water

Lead, unlike many other drinking water contaminants, is usually not present in the drinking water source, but rather results from the distribution system or on site plumbing itself.

EPA office building

Clean Water Action: EPA's proposal is missing the best way to get the lead out

“EPA’s proposal lacks the most proactive step we can take to reduce lead at the tap - a timeline and a requirement for full lead service line replacement,”  said Lynn Thorp, Clean Water Action National Campaigns Director. “There is a clear public health case and national momentum to get the lead out through a holistic and thorough plan to replace service lines.”

 

Corroded pipe with lead service fittings. Credit: Mike Thomas / Creative Commons

EPA Can Do More to Protect Our Communities from Lead

EPA chose not to require full replacement of lead service lines — the largest source of lead in drinking water — and stopped short of other measures to reduce exposure.

pitcher of water. photo: successo images / shutterstock.com

Comments on Denver Water's Draft Lead Reduction Plan

Clean Water Action strongly supports Denver Water’s commitment to seek an alternative to orthophosphate that will achieve the same or greater reduction in lead exposure risk for its customers.

Lead and Drinking Water

Lead is a highly poisonous metal and can affect almost every organ in the body and the nervous system. It is a naturally occurring element found, due to human activity, in all parts of our environment.

From We All Live Downstream

Lead Service Line
January 14, 2020

The purpose of the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) Lead and Copper Rule (LCR) is to reduce lead and copper at the tap. EPA’s proposed revisions to the LCR make significant changes to the aspects related to lead. EPA is accepting comments on the proposal until February 13, 2020. This is the second in a series of blog posts on specific aspects of EPA’s proposal. Read Part 1 here.

EPA office building
December 6, 2019

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has proposed long-awaited revisions to the Lead and Copper Rule (LCR). The LCR is a National Primary Drinking Water Regulation under the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA). Its purpose is to reduce lead and copper at the tap in drinking water provided by regulated Public Water Systems. This is the first part in a series. Read part 2 here.

Corroded pipe with lead service fittings. Credit: Mike Thomas / Creative Commons
October 4, 2019

On September 6, 2019 Denver Water submitted its final Lead Reduction Program Plan to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This groundbreaking plan is an alternative to a mandate from the Colorado Department of Public Health and the Environment (CDPHE) that Denver Water treat its water with orthophosphate.