Strengthening Clean Water Protections

Clean Water is working to ensure that small streams and wetlands are protected under the Clean Water Act’s pollution control programs.  The Clean Water Rule restores safeguards to most streams and wetlands and protects the drinking water sources for more than 117 million people.

Lake Erie Algal Bloom - August 2015. Photo Credit: NOAA Great Lakes CoastWatch

Harmful Algal Outbreaks and Drinking Water

In summer 2014 the residents in and around Toledo, Ohio were told not to drink, cook, or bathe with the water from their faucets.

Clean Water Currents | Spring 2016

Clean Water Currents Spring 2016

In this issue: Putting Drinking Water First; EPA and Congress Take Action; Curbing Climate Pollution from the Oil and Gas Industry Now, Not Later; New Methane Standards in Pennsylvania; Aliso Canyon and Lost Hills: Symptons of a Broken System; and more.

Critique of EPA’s Failure to Quantify and Monetize Health and Economic Benefits of Cleaner Source and Drinking Water

The 5.5 billion pounds of pollution that power plants discharge into our rivers, lakes, and streams each year places a heavy burden on our drinking

From We All Live Downstream

Trump's head
February 11, 2020

These cuts won’t just mean that EPA is doing less to protect our water, they also hit state and local governments and drinking water systems hard. States where Clean Water Action works would lose out on federal funding, leaving taxpayers and ratepayers holding the bag. 

Oil and water. Credit Andrew Grinberg
January 30, 2020

To stave off the worst effects of the climate crisis, the global and U.S. economies need to decarbonize as fast as possible. Capturing carbon emissions from industrial sources and pulling carbon out of the air via direct air capture are technologies we will likely need in our toolbox if we are to achieve net zero or negative greenhouse gas emissions.

Trump's Dirty Water Rule
January 23, 2020

The Trump administration finalized its signature Clean Water Act rollback, the Dirty Water Rule. This extreme interpretation of our bedrock water quality law rolls back the clock to a time when corporate polluters could dump toxic waste into rivers and streams and pave over wetlands without seeking a permit.