Michigan Blog Posts

Vote! Credit:  PhotoStockImage / Shutterstock

Michigan Primary Elections are Tomorrow! Vote for Our Water.

August 6, 2018

Tomorrow across Michigan, voters will be head to the polls to cast ballots for candidates that represent their values and priorities.

Water from a faucet / photo: istock

Michigan Needs Science-Driven Standards for PFAS in Drinking Water

July 10, 2018

In mid-June, after months of pressure from Clean Water Action members and public health advocates, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) finally released their study on the health effects of PFAS contamination.

Septic tank lid. photo: flickr.com/mmwm (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Michigan needs a strong statewide sanitary code

May 9, 2018

Each year, 9.4 billion gallons of raw sewage flow into our lakes and rivers from leaking septic systems, but Michigan is the only state in the U.S. without a uniform sanitary code requiring periodic inspections of septic systems.

Lake Michigan, photo: flickr.com/elviskennedy  (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Nestle Wins and our Great Lakes Lose

April 9, 2018

Last week, the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality did the unthinkable; they ruled in favor of Nestle in their controversial bid to double the amount of water they pump for next to nothing and sell back to us.

Great Lakes / photo: flickr.com/gsfc (CC BY 2.0)

How Big Oil is Using Big Bucks to Put Our Great Lakes at Risk

December 5, 2017

We have two options here: demand our elected officials to act on behalf of their constituents and decommission Line 5 before it fails, or continue to elect people like Governor Snyder and Attorney General Schuette and keep our fingers crossed.

Tittabawassee River photo: flickr.com/collins_family (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Three million gallons of sewage, a contaminated river, and Michigan’s water infrastructure woes

November 6, 2017

Last week, Saginaw Township’s wastewater retention and treatment basins overflowed. After just over two inches of rainfall stressed the outdated sewer infrastructure to its failing point, over three million gallons of partially treated sewage was released into the Tittabawassee River.