Solomon Brooks - Maryland Intern

Baltimore's 2020 Sewer Update

February 28, 2020

On Thursday, January 23, Baltimore’s Department of Public Works held a public information session on its tasks and progress on sewers and Baltimore’s sewage consent decree. DPW lawyer Paul DeSantis spoke for the brunt of presentation, and afterwards six stations were also held to elucidate issues in the eye of the public.

The drain field component of a residential septic system is being put in place. Creative Commons license.

Septic Systems and the Climate Crisis

January 6, 2020

If your home is in a rural area in Maryland, your sinks, toilets, showers, dishwasher, and washing machine probably empty into a septic tank. How does a septic tank work? Watery waste, or effluent, is most of the waste, where anaerobic bacteria begin to break it down. The sludge, or inorganic solids which are the leftovers of bacteria digesting organic effluent, falls to the bottom of the tank.

The Baltimore City Council investigates sewage floods

November 27, 2019

"Raw sewage is bad for human health - this is universal." -Chris Heaney, Associate Professor for Environmental Health and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University

 

"Closed Means Closed:" the 311 system in Baltimore City and pollution

November 11, 2019

On Thursday October 22 at 2:00 pm, I attended the Baltimore City Council committee’s hearing on Bill 19-0163R, an informational hearing 311, the language behind closure of a service request, and improvement of the 311 system.

Touring the Patapsco Wastewater Treatment Plant

October 23, 2019
On October 15th, I visited the Patapsco Wastewater Treatment Plant on a tour with Baltimore Heritage. Though the plant was originally constructed in 1940, the iteration that exists today was finished in 1985 and treats wastewater: 90% from households, and 10% from industrial sources. This wastewater comes from South and West Baltimore city, along with Baltimore, Anne Arundel and Howard Counties.